Well-Being

How eudaimonic and hedonic motives relate to the well-being of close others

Past research has examined the link of eudaimonic and hedonic motives with personal well-being but less is known about their link with the well-being of close others. Also empirical data on the link with the well-being of close others would address an ongoing debate regarding whether eudaimonia is egoistic and possibly detrimental to others....

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Happiness, inspiration and the fully functioning person: Separating hedonic and eudaimonic well-being in the workplace

The study investigates the idea that feeling good and functioning well-being are regulated by two different mechanisms: hedonic and eudaimonic. At the state level it is assumed that happiness is a hedonic feeling typically experienced when life is easy or a goal is reached....

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Day-of-week mood patterns in the United States: On the existence of 'Blue Monday' 'Thank God it's Friday' and weekend effects

There are many beliefs about the patterning of positive and negative mood over the course of the week. Support has been found for ‘Blue Monday’ ‘Thank God it’s Friday’ and Weekdays versus Weekend effects although in relatively small studies and often with student samples....

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An examination of patience and well-being

Patience is the propensity to wait calmly in the face of frustration or adversity. The new 3-Factor Patience Scale (Study 1) measures three types of patience (interpersonal life hardship and daily hassles patience) which differentially relate to well-being and personality....

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Influencing value priorities and increasing well-being: The effects of reflecting on intrinsic values

A four-week experimental study (N¼113) examined the effects of reflecting on intrinsic values. In the experimental group participants learned about the distinction between intrinsic (e.g. having close relationships) and extrinsic (e.g....

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Influences on current mood of eliciting life-satisfaction judgments

Subjective well-being (SWB) has attracted a plethora of cross-disciplinary research in recent years. As measured in this research SWB includes a cognitive and an affective component....

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Does savoring increase happiness? A daily diary study

Bryant and Veroff (2007 Savoring: A new model of positive experience. Mahwah NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates) have proposed that savoring namely regulating the emotional impact of positive events by one’s cognitive or behavioral responses increases happiness....

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Emotional intelligence predicts components of subjective well-being beyond personality: A two-country study using self- and informant reports

This study aimed to examine the ability of overall emotional intelligence (EI) to predict cognitive and affective components of subjective well-being. University students in Germany and Turkey responded to self-report measures of EI, Big Five personality traits, life satisfaction, and positive and negative affect....

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Do values placed on cognative abilities shift with age?

Despite age-associated decreases in cognitive and physical abilities age is not associated with a decrease in ratings of well-being; this phenomenon is termed the ‘paradox of well-being.’ One potential explanation for this paradox may be that older adults place less value on cognitive abilities that have been shown to decrease with age (e.g....

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The preference for experiences over possessions: Measurement and construct validation of the Experiential Buying Tendency Scale

There is growing support that money spent on experiential items increases an individual’s happiness. However there is minimal research on the causes and long-term consequences of the tendency to make experiential purchases....

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