Subordinate social adaptability and the consequences of abusive supervision perceptions in two samples

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Subordinate social adaptability and the consequences of abusive supervision perceptions in two samples
The Leadership Quarterly

The present investigation examined social adaptability as a moderator of the relationships between perceptions of abusive supervision and several work outcomes. Specifically we hypothesized that individuals with lower levels of social adaptability would be more adversely affected by heightened levels of abusive supervision perceptions than employees with greater levels of social adaptability. Data from two samples offered strong support for the hypotheses. Specifically employees with lower levels of social adaptability reported heightened job tension (i.e. Sample 1) and emotional exhaustion (Samples 1 & 2) as well as diminished job satisfaction (Samples 1 & 2) and work effort (Samples 1 & 2) as perceptions of abusive supervision increased whereas employees with greater social adaptability skill were less strongly affected by their perceptions of abusive supervision. Contributions of the research to scholarship and practice strengths and limitations and directions for future research are discussed.

Citation: 
The Leadership Quarterly 24 (2013) 732 – 746

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